Category Archives: Entertainment

Lohan’s attorney seeks deal with prosecutors

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Lindsay Lohan’s attorney has suggested to prosecutors that the actress serve as a motivational speaker and perform non-jail activities to resolve her latest criminal case, according to a letter obtained Tuesday.

The letter from lawyer Mark Heller proposed several alternatives for Lohan, who could be sent to jail if a judge determines her actions in a traffic crash violated terms of her probation in a previous theft case.

His letter states that Lohan’s turbulent home life has deeply impacted her and requires a different approach in the case.

The actress plans to spend time recording public service announcements and make “periodic visits to schools, hospitals, and other venues where she may provide inspirational talks, encouraging children to pursue positive goals and avoid bad habits,” states the letter filed on Friday and released by the court Tuesday.

Heller also proposed the establishment of a nonprofit foundation in Lohan’s name to benefit young people.

The actress “has made a commitment to herself to elevate her life and participate in activities which will advance her desire to lead a model life,” Heller wrote in a motion seeking a delay in the case that returns to court on Friday. Trial is now set for March 18.

Lohan is charged with three misdemeanor charges of reckless driving, lying to police and obstructing officers from performing their duties. She has pleaded not guilty.

The actress could face 245 days in jail if she is found to be in violation of her probation.

The star of “Mean Girls” and “Freaky Friday” was sentenced to psychotherapy in November of 2011 in cases involving theft and drunken driving charges, but she has not been required to attend counseling since being placed on informal probation in March 2012.

Those terms were imposed by Judge Stephanie Sautner, who is retiring and will no longer handle Lohan’s case.

The crash that prompted the current charges occurred in June on Pacific Coast Highway while Lohan was on the way to a movie shoot.

Terry White, chief deputy city attorney in Santa Monica, declined comment on the letter. He said discussions about a possible resolution are scheduled to take place this week.

Lohan, 26, was on her way to a beach shoot with another person for the TV movie “Liz and Dick” when her car crashed into the back of a dump truck. Police allege she lied about being behind the wheel.

Heller is also seeking dismissal of the charges against Lohan, arguing that police ignored her when she said she didn’t want to be interviewed without her attorney present.

Lohan was at the hospital at the time, not in custody, and showed no signs of impairment when officers gave her a field sobriety test, the lawyer said.

Oscar hosting: Is it a thankless task?

NEW YORK (AP) — The love-him-or-hate-him reaction to Seth MacFarlane’s turn as Academy Awards host is evidence that one of the most high-profile jobs in show business is becoming one of its most thankless.

The “Family Guy” creator and first-time Oscars host seemed unusually preoccupied with his reviews both before and during Sunday’s show. He predicted he’d be ripped apart and he was, particularly on social media. He also had his fans, with many suggesting the motion picture academy got precisely the kind of performance it expected and wanted in hiring someone known for his subversive, even crude humor.

As is often the case with the Oscars, the major awards themselves — “Argo” as best picture, Daniel Day Lewis and Jennifer Lawrence as top actors — hewed closely to pre-show predictions. The host’s performance is the most unpredictable element of the show, and it seems the negative experiences have the most mileage. David Letterman’s awkward 1995 turn is well-remembered, most of all by him. Chris Rock tried to bring some edge in 2005 and fell flat. James Franco and Anne Hathaway’s snoozefest in 2011 is still being talked about.

After Franco and Hathaway, the Oscars returned last year to the tried and true — eight-time host Billy Crystal — and faced criticism that the reliable had become the stodgy.

To some ears, MacFarlane’s material — which included a song-and-dance number about breast-baring actresses, a domestic violence joke involving Rihanna and Chris Brown, and references to Mel Gibson’s racial slurs — didn’t make the grade.

“If you’re going to the edge, you have to be funny,” said comic Joy Behar on “The View” Monday. “To me, I love Seth, but it wasn’t funny enough.”

Behar’s colleague, Whoopi Goldberg — a four-time Oscars host — had a bit more empathy, noting that people in MacFarlane’s position have a tough line to walk. The Oscars can’t force a younger audience to be interested just by hiring a younger host, she said, and a younger host has to know the audience that is out there.

Robert Thompson, director of Syracuse University’s Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture, agreed that MacFarlane’s was a difficult position.

“Your job description is that you are trying to appeal to people who are not necessarily watching the Oscars to get them to watch, and at the same time appeal to people who are actually watching it,” he said. “That’s not an easy thing to do.”

The Nielsen Co. said an estimated 40.3 million people watched the Academy Awards on Sunday, up 1 million from last year and the first time since 2010 that the show topped the 40 million mark. More importantly for ABC, ratings for the 18-to-49-year-old demographic were up 11 percent over 2012. That’s the age group upon which ABC bases its advertising rates, and MacFarlane was brought in this year in part to attract a younger audience.

The telecast was likely also propelled by the second screen experience, which has steadily grown in recent years as a driver of ratings for major live TV events. Twitter said that there were a total of 8.9 million tweets about the Academy Awards during the show and red carpet arrivals. That fell short of both the Grammys earlier in the month (more than 14 million tweets) and the record 24.1 million tweets about the recent Super Bowl and halftime show.

Arguably MacFarlane’s most offensive joke, measured by the audience’s groans, referred to actors who had tried to play Abraham Lincoln over the years. “I would argue that the actor who really got inside Lincoln’s head was John Wilkes Booth,” MacFarlane said of Lincoln’s assassin.

In addition, a pre-taped song about movies where famous actresses displayed their breasts was seen by some women as sexist — and a much-echoed criticism of MacFarlane’s Oscar performance.

“Watching the Oscars last night meant sitting through a series of crudely sexist antics led by a scrubby, self-satisfied Seth MacFarlane. That would be tedious enough,” wrote the New Yorker’s Amy Davidson. “But the evening’s misogyny involved a specific hostility to women in the workplace, which raises broader questions than whether the Academy can possibly get Tina Fey and Amy Poehler to host next year. It was unattractive and sour, and started with a number called ‘We Saw Your Boobs.'”

On Monday, the Anti-Defamation League added itself to the list of those offended by MacFarlane, protesting his joke, through the teddy bear character in MacFarlane’s movie “Ted,” about Jewish control over Hollywood. The bear, voiced by MacFarlane, claimed he was “born Theodore Shapiro and I would like to donate money to Israel and continue to work in Hollywood forever.”

MacFarlane seemed completely aware of what he was doing, and there were no indications he pulled any surprises. The motion picture academy granted him complete freedom to write the show as he saw fit but did see MacFarlane’s routines ahead of time. The Academy had no immediate comment when contacted on Monday about MacFarlane’s performance.

Some critics figured MacFarlane was in a can’t-win situation. Brought on to deliver “edge,” and perhaps some of the younger movie audience that enjoyed “Ted,” he was little known to a large portion of the Academy Awards audience. They didn’t know his style of humor, either.

“For a guy who had the deck stacked against him before he started, MacFarlane did a surprisingly impressive job,” wrote critic Tim Goodman in the Hollywood Reporter.

Critic Frazier Moore of The Associated Press said MacFarlane went back and forth between the Bad Seth and Good Seth throughout the night — and gave high marks to both.

“Both were very funny, stewarding a broadcast that never went askew,” Moore wrote.

___

Associated Press Writer Jake Coyle contributed to this report.

___

EDITOR’S NOTE — David Bauder can be reached at dbauder(at)ap.org or at http://www.twitter.com/dbauder .

Senate Intelligence Committee drops ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ probe

Jessica Chastain in Zero Dark Thirtyquot;

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — One day after “Zero Dark Thirty” failed to win major awards at the Oscars, a congressional aide said on Monday the Senate Intelligence Committee has closed its inquiry into the filmmakers’ contacts with the Central Intelligence Agency.

The intelligence committee gathered more information from the CIA, film director Kathryn Bigelow, and screenwriter Mark Boal and will not take further action, according to the aide, who requested anonymity.

Sony Pictures Entertainment, which produced the film, had no immediate comment. But attacks by Washington politicians may have damaged its prospects at the Academy Awards. “Zero Dark Thirty” was nominated for a best picture award, which it did not win. Also, in what industry watchers considered a snub, Bigelow did not receive a best director nomination.

Bing: ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ controversy

The Senate committee launched its review of the film, a dramatization of how the U.S. government located and killed Osama bin Laden, after its chairwoman, Senator Dianne Feinstein, expressed outrage over scenes that implied that “enhanced interrogations” of CIA detainees produced an breakthrough that helped lead to the al Qaeda leader.

In December, as “Zero Dark Thirty” was about to premiere nationwide, Feinstein joined fellow Democrat Carl Levin, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, and Republican Senator John McCain in condemning “particularly graphic scenes of CIA officers torturing detainees” in the film.

A source familiar with contacts between the filmmakers and intelligence officials said the CIA did not tell the filmmakers “enhanced interrogations” led to bin Laden. Instead, the agency helped develop characters in the film, said the source.

The political fallout prompted Bigelow to write in an op-ed piece: “Those of us who work in the arts know that depiction is not endorsement. If it was, no artist would be able to paint inhumane practices, no author could write about them, and no filmmaker could delve into the thorny subjects of our time.”

The government cooperated as much, if not more, on “Argo,” the film about the 1979-81 hostage crisis in Iran that won the best picture Oscar. Actor-director Ben Affleck and his team were allowed to film scenes in the lobby of the CIA building in Langley, Virginia; the “Zero Dark Thirty” crew did no such filming.